Scientific Committee

The conference’s scientific committee is comprised of experts recognized for their knowledge concerning the conference themes: diversity and inclusion in the workplace; youth and seniors; family diversity; Canada’s Pride movement; and global issues.

The experts come from different backgrounds to ensure a multiplicity of points of view.

The Scientific Committee members are:

  • Mona Greenbaum, Co-President
  • Bill Ryan, Co-President
  • Marie-Ève Baron Giroudeau, Fierté Montréal
  • Marie-Pier Boisvert, Conseil québécois LGBT
  • Line Chamberland, chaire de recherche sur l’homophobie
  • Marie Geoffroy, chaire de recherche sur l’homophobie
  • Matthew Halse, Aids Community Care Montreal
  • Marie Houzeau, GRIS-Montréal
  • Gina Metallic, Two-Spirit Indigenous Social Worker
  • Gabriel Mujimbere, Arc-en-ciel d’Afrique
  • Clark Pignedoli
  • Éric Pineault, Fierté Montréal

Biographies

Mona Greenbaum

Mona Greenbaum

Co-President

Mona Greenbaum is the co-founder and executive director of the LGBT Family Coalition, an association that advocates for families with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans parents. The organization received three Arc-en-ciel Awards in recognition of its social activism. The Coalition’s primary mission is to train people who work in schools and social services.

To date, the Coalition has held more than 500 training sessions in 15 regions of the province of Québec, sensitizing more than 16,000 people about the need to intervene against homophobic and transphobic violence, heteronormativity and harassment based on gender expression.

In 2010, Mona received the Médaille de l’Assemblée nationale du Québec, in honour of her many years of activism within the LGBT community.

In 2013, she was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in recognition of her work for the LGBT community in Canada.

In 2015, on the 40th anniversary of the Charter, the Québec Commission on Human Rights and Youth Rights selected Mona as one of the 40 people having led exceptional careers in the defense or advocacy of the rights included in the Charter.


Bill Ryan

Bill Ryan

Co-President

Educated at the University of Ottawa, the Université de Paris and Dalhousie University, Bill Ryan is a social worker and adult educator involved in sexual education, LGBTQI2S health and HIV-related work since 1985, when he founded the first support group for persons with HIV in the Atlantic Provinces.

Since moving to Montréal, he has taught in the social work department of McGill University, and has consulted and offered training on issues related to sex education, prevention of STIs, care and policy development on the local, national and international levels.

His research has centered on gay youth, homophobia, gay men’s health, same-sex parenting, aging in the gay and lesbian population, sexual education, schoolyard homophobic bullying, access to health care and the development of support services.  He teaches the only course at McGill University on counseling issues related to sexual orientation and gender identity.

In 2001, he was named a Hero of the AIDS Crisis by the Farha Foundation. In 2009, he was named Person of the Year by the Gay and Lesbian Council of Québec. In 2010, he was awarded Montréal’s Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award, and was named one of the Top Ten Researchers in Gender and Health by the Institute of Gender and Health of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.


Marie-Ève Baron Giroudeau

Marie-Ève Baron Giroudeau

Scientific Committee Member

Marie-Ève Baron has been a member of Montréal Pride’s board of directors for six years now and has been actively involved in the organization’s local and international activities.

She is particularly passionate about the participation of women and trans-identified individuals in the business and social networks of the entire LGBT+ community. She also believes that Montréal has a leadership role to play for LGBT+ communities around the world, providing a model of inclusion. She also sat on the board of directors of the ATQ (Aide aux Trans du Québec) for more than two years and received an award to underscore her contribution to the organization of International Transgender Pride Day. Marie-Ève is not only involved in her community, but is also an engineer and corporate trainer. Having recently completed her master’s degree in management, she uses these new skills in her professional life and also in her community. She has many projects underway in the coming years, from conferences on gender identity, parenthood and transsexuality to international LGBT projects. Despite her active career, Marie-Ève remains dedicated to her family and, especially, to her wife, the love of her life.


Marie-Pier Boisvert

Marie-Pier Boisvert

Scientific Committee Member

Marie-Pier Boisvert is the executive director of the Conseil québécois LGBT, where she works closely with the community for the mobilization of LGBTQ+ groups throughout Québec in order to make their issues known to the public and to the government.

She is a consultant for various Québec and Canadian ministries on gender and sexual diversity issues, and is a co-researcher for the SAVIE-LGBTQ project of the Research Chair on Homophobia at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She was a trainer and speaker at GRIS Estrie and GRIS Montréal, and co-founded LGBT Pride in Sherbrooke in 2013. She holds a master’s degree in literature from the Université de Sherbrooke where she explored the diversity of love in Québec literature. Her experiences and involvement in the community has led to invitations to speak, and she has given several lectures within the context of her work and studies, notably in Sherbrooke, Montréal, Ottawa, Halifax and in Berkeley, California.


Line Chamberland

Line Chamberland

Scientific Committee Member

Line Chamberland is a professor in the Department of Sexology at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and holds the Research Chair on Homophobia at UQAM.

As a sociologist, she is interested in the life experiences of gay and lesbian people. Early on in her career, her involvement as the researcher in various associations and community groups enabled her to forge fruitful partnerships with many social stakeholders. The quality of her expertise has earned her numerous research grants, including several in the following fields of study: homophobic violence in schools and its impact on the academic success of young people; homophobic discrimination in the workplace; adaptation of health and social services to meet the needs to sexual minorities and aging populations. Line Chamberland is currently conducting an extensive survey on the social inclusion and exclusion of LGBTQ people throughout Québec. Her work is highly esteemed, both nationally and internationally. She is regularly invited to scientific events for students, researchers and community partners as well as for policy makers.


Marie Geoffroy

Marie Geoffroy

Scientific Committee Member

Marie Geoffroy holds a master’s degree in sexology with a concentration on research and intervention from the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM).

While completing her master’s degree, she specialized in the discrimination and micro-aggression experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees, on the effects of victimization on their mental health and on the organizational factors facilitating their inclusion in a climate of support and openness. She has been a guest speaker at the Canadian Bar Association, Pride at Work and several universities in Canada and Belgium. She is currently the coordinator of the Research Chair on Homophobia at UQAM and for the SAVIE-LGBTQ project funded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s Partnership Program.


Matthew Halse

Matthew Halse

Scientific Committee Member

Matthew Halse is Executive Director at ACCM- AIDS Community Care Montreal, Quebec’s oldest HIV services agency celebrating our 30th anniversary this year. ACCM is home to 36 programs which provide support services to people living with HIV, prevents new incidences, and promotes community mobilization.

Matthew is also an instructor in the Sexualities stream of the department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research at Western University where he has taught courses on Critical Masculinities, Introduction to Gay Culture, and Gender, Sexuality and Disability. He has published and presented widely on PrEP, political participation and queer activism, and queer literature. Actively involved in LGBT community organizing,  Matthew is a director at the Coalition des organismes communautaire québécois de lutte contre le sida (COCQ-SIDA). His dissertation in Political Theory is entitled “Another Possibility: HIV and the Contemporary Moment.”


Marie Houzeau

Marie Houzeau

Scientific Committee Member

Marie Houzeau has headed the Groupe de Recherche et d’Intervention Sociale (GRIS-Montréal) since 2005.

Founded in 1994, this community organization has become the most trusted voice for demystifying homosexuality and bisexuality in schools in Québec. Marie has shared her expertise overseas, from Geneva to Besançon to Antwerp, as well as throughout Canada, from Vancouver to Toronto and, of course, in Montréal. She has lectured extensively at human rights forums, and at trade union, scientific and professional conferences. Marie also sat on the board of the Conseil québécois LGBT, in addition to chairing the Gay and Lesbian International Sport Association (GLISA), which oversees the Outgames, an international sports competition bringing together thousands of LGBT athletes and their allies. Marie consults as a trainer for the Institut National de Santé publique du Québec (INSPQ). She has trained thousands of professionals from the health, social services, community and education sectors to adapt their interventions to LGBT clients and to be sensitive to their vulnerabilities. She is regularly invited to participate as a co-researcher on university research teams, notably with the Research Chair on Homophobia at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and the Culture du témoignage (“Culture of Testimony”) team at Université du Québec à Montréal. In 2016, she was honored twice for her commitment to building a world more open to diversity, receiving the medal of the National Assembly of Québec, and the “Woman of Distinction” award from the Y Women’s Foundation.


Gina Metallic

Gina Metallic

Scientific Committee Member

Gina Metallic is a Mig’maq Two Spirit Indigenous Feminist from the Listuguj Mig’maq First Nation, located on the border of Québec and New Brunswick.  She is currently living in Ottawa with her wife.

Gina obtained her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Educational & Counselling Psychology at McGill University, later to purse a Master of Social Work in Community Development. Metallic’s graduate work focused on Two Spirit Identity development, and wrote and analyzed her own coming out journey, and the intersectionality between being a Queer, Indigenous and hyper-feminine womyn.

Gina is a five-time scholarship recipient of the Foundation for the Advancement of Aboriginal Youth (FAAY), now known as Inspire; a Canadian Indigenous scholarship program. She is also a member of the Golden Key International Honor Society, an award given to the top 15% of students, which was attained during her MSW graduating year.

Gina has been a guest speaker on the topic of Two Spirit issues and Indigenous child welfare practices for the Annual Pierre Elliott Trudeau Conference, the RCMP National Headquarters, Canadian colleges and universities, and multiple Indigenous organizations. Gina has also been a guest writer for the Montreal Gazette and has appeared on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) for the series “Working it Out Together,” on the topic of Child Welfare and Two Spirit Gifts. Most recently, Gina was involved in the first Two-Spirit Conference held on a reserve in Quebec, which was hosted by the Quebec Native Women Association. In addition, Gina was also featured on an episode of “Sexplora,” a Radio Canada television series. Gina sits on the 2017 Canada Pride Steering Committee.

Gina is a Registered Social Worker through the Ontario College of Social Workers.”


Gabriel Mujimbere

Gabriel Mujimbere

Scientific Committee Member

Gabriel Mujimbere is an activist and queer artist of Burundian origins.

He made his first performance for the defense of the rights of homosexuals in Burundi with the Lampyre dance troupe in 2010 by interpreting “homosexual” in a show entitled Compilation. He was also a member of “Humure” since 2009, Burundi’s first gay rights association. Another step in his community involvement was taken in 2012, when he began working as the head of the MSM project at ANSS (Association Nationale de Soutien au Séropositif et aux malades du sida), the only program in Burundi that dealt with the sexual health of men who have sex with men (MSM). As part of his duties, he made multiple public interventions (conferences, radio broadcasts, social networks, etc.) as a MSM, notwithstanding the Burundian Penal Code that condemns same-sex sexual relations. He arrived in Canada on November 21, 2015 and soon joined the African Rainbow organization. He has now left his position at the Africa Rainbow Board of Directors to join the permanent staff as executive director of the organization.


Clark Pignedoli

Clark Pignedoli

Scientific Committee Member

Clark is engaged in queer and trans communities in Quebec and in Italy.

In Quebec, he mostly participate in mobilizations concerning trans migrant’s rights and the circulation of trans knowledge within the university. Clark is a member of the Trans March – Gender Euphoria collective and of the LGBT Quebec Council’s trans comittee. He has also collaborated with Asst(e)q.

Clark is doing a PhD at UQAM where he is working on Drag King workshops starting from a trans perspective.

In Italy, he is part of Asterischi*, a peer support group for trans and gender questioning people.


Éric Pineault

Éric Pineault

Scientific Committee Member

Éric Pineault began his involvement in LGBT associations in 1996 thanks to volleyball, a sport he has practiced for 28 years. From 1997 to 2000, Éric served as a director, secretary and producer of outdoor public events on the Board of Directors of the Rainbow Festival in Quebec City. Between 2000 and 2004, Éric worked at several volleyball clubs, as vice-president and president. He founded VOLLEY BOREAL in 2004. At the head of this LGBT volleyball club, Éric organized around 30 international tournaments.

This sporting involvement opened many doors for him. First, as the director of rowing regattas for the Canadian championship and the North American Masters. He also worked for the 1st World OutGames for 3 years as Sports Coordinator, Communications and Marketing Project Manager and Acting Director of Sport.

He sat on the Board of Directors of Équipe Montréal as a director, secretary and vice-president and served as general manager for 2 years.

When Divers/cité, the organization organizing the Montréal Pride from 1993 to 2006, announced in 2007 that it was becoming an LGBT cultural festival, it was only natural that Eric decided to found, in collaboration with several community organizations, LGBTA Celebrations Montréal, now named Montréal Pride.

In addition, Éric presides at the PACEL Institute, a personal growth center where students can become energy therapy practitioners. In addition to being a passionate organizer, Éric is a practitioner and teacher of energy therapy.